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Topp Paleo Flatbread

 I eat mostly Paleo. My biggest cheat is a package of these amazing tortillas that you buy already made, but still raw. All you have to do is cook them, and oh my…

Problem – they are NOT Paleo. They are NOT gluten free. They have no nutritional value. Also, they are NOT good for my daughter. It’s cruel when we eat them, because she can’t have them and misses them. But they are my weakness.

This is the ONE thing I haven’t been able to replicate. Until now.

Rhonda, from A Journey to Embrace, gave me this recipe. It’s a keeper! Thanks, Rhonda for allowing me to post this!

Paleo Flatbread

Ingredients:
1/2 cup Blanched Almond Flour   (I use Honeyville)
1/2 cup Arrowroot Flour
3-4 egg whites
salt to taste- (I use Himalayan)
pepper to taste
1-2 Tbsp water. (the batter should be thin)
Coconut oil to cook your flat bread

Note: You can replace the Almond Flour with 1/4 cup Coconut Flour and increase your water to 1/2 cup -3/4 cups.  

Topp Paleo flatbread

Mix all ingredients together. (except Coconut Oil)

Heat coconut oil in skillet. Remove your skillet from the heat source while you add some of your mix to the skillet. This way you will have time to spread it all out before it cooks. With your spoon form your tortilla shaped bread. Cook just like you would a pancake.Your flat bread may be a bit stiff when you first remove them from the skillet and you will think no way is it going to be flexible and bend.  After they have cooled a bit, they become more pliable and hold up rather well.  (I noticed the ones I made with coconut flour were never stiff.) This made 2 flatbreads but if you made them smaller you could make 3.  Adding the extra egg white or another tablespoon or two of water helps make them thinner.  The first couple of batches I made were round, although not perfectly round and were a little thick.
Rhonda Topping is a Wife, Mom, Nana, Homeschooling Mom, Military Mom, Christian, Paleo, and Gluten Free Warrior. After she was failed by Conventional Medicine, she started on a journey back to health with a Functional Medicine Doctor and a Paleo Lifestyle. Follow Rhonda at
https://www.facebook.com/JourneyToEmbrace

Chicken Broth

Chicken Bone Broth – Part Two

In Part One, I told you about the benefits to making your own chicken broth. Here’s a recap:

  • economical
  • healthy
  • healing properties

You’ve roasted the chickens and all (or most, it’s OK to leave some) the meat is off the bones. Now you are ready to make broth! Remember, this is just how I make broth. You don’t have to roast your chicken first. It’s important to remember that there is a difference in health benefits from chicken broth and chicken BONE broth. You want the nutrients and minerals that come from the bones. The broth you buy in the stores not only does NOT have this, they add all kinds of sodium, MSG, and preservatives. Due to my food allergies, I can’t risk buying it from the store. Once you get the hang of how easy this is… you won’t go back! Did you realize not all chicken broth is gluten free? This is!

Chicken Broth

Drop the bones back into the pot you cooked the chickens. There should be a gelatinous substance left in the pot. You can also put everything into a crock pot. Remember the innards you kept? (First step in Roasting Chickens.) Throw those in too. Fill the pot with water, add a Tablespoon or two of Apple Cider Vinegar (any acid will work – it draws the nutrients out of the bones) and cook on medium just until it starts to bubble. Turn it to low and simmer for 12 to 24 hours. For the last few hours add some veggies (completely optional). Some people have veggies in the whole time, but I’ve heard that onions can turn bitter after 8 hours.  Strain the broth and store in the fridge.  After it has cooled in the fridge, the fat rises to the top and hardens. I throw that part away. The broth can last in the fridge for up to ten days.

This is where I’m supposed to have a picture of the broth all done and strained – liquid gold… but we ate it all before I could take a picture.

Here’s a little secret most don’t realize – you can use the same bones to make more broth! Put all the bones BACK into the pot, cover with water and do the whole process again! However, I find that each batch will be a bit more watery, so I just do it twice, if that long. By this time, I’m ready to move on… but some people keep continual batches of stock brewing. I only use the second and third brewings for boiling rice or quinoa. I’ll immediately freeze this broth and label the bag accordingly.

What do you use the broth for? Anytime a recipe calls for it. But that’s just the start. I use broth  in place of water when cooking rice, quiona, or potatoes (as I just mentioned, this is usually the second-batch broth). For a quick lunch, I heat some broth and throw in some veggies, rice, or roasted chicken. It’s a great way to use up leftovers! Some people just drink it plain. I’m not there yet. I have to add something into my broth. What isn’t used after a few days, I store in freezer bags in two cup increments. Anytime I need some, I just thaw a bag enough to open it then heat the block of frozen broth on the stove until it’s liquid again. I haven’t had to buy broth at the store since I made my first stockpile. I probably have ten bags frozen now, with two birds ready to cook tomorrow.

Recipe Switch-A-Roo Pot-luck Adventure

Tonight I am going to a Pot-luck. My family is excited. Well, some of us are – the ones who can eat anything. I am not one of those. Being the one to cook and not eat is frustrating. Normally I would cook a quick, easy, yummy, cheap meal for the pot luck and just eat something “safe” beforehand. That started changing when I had to think about my daughter’s many food allergies, not just mine. Now that my awareness is growing, I want to bring foods that many people with food issues can eat. I searched the internet for a meal we both could eat. I found one. It would be a bit time-consuming and a tad more expensive, but I was determined. THEN I read the email. NO NUTS. My recipe has almond flour. The other gluten-free flours are safe for my daughter, but not for me. *sigh*

Back to the drawing board.

Then I remembered my own advice, Keep it simple.

So I will.

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Lettuce boats!

I roasted a whole chicken for dinner last night. Using the leftover chicken, I chopped it up. I’ll prepare the rest of the ingredients, then heat the chicken and assemble right before we leave.

To assemble:

Romaine lettuce leaves, separated and spread out, with the spine down and the top open – the boat.

Spread meat over the leaves.

Top with sauce: avocado, 1/2 cucumber, tahini – if  you have it, dash of salt

Provide a small bowl of extra toppings: tomato, cucumber, whatever else you want

Make a sign that informs guests: Lettuce boats! Gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, paleo

Not only is this one of my family’s favorite recipes, it’s fun to eat too! That’s my Recipe Switch-A-Roo for tonight! I’m still searching for the rest of the recipes on my list!

One New Thing for the Holidays

Candies, cakes, pies, turkey, dressing, sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows or sugary pecans, fruit salad smothered with whipped cream, more pies, and cookies, oh my. My mouth is watering just thinking back over the week. This is probably the first time EVER that I did not gain weight during Thanksgiving week. I took my own advice and ate just one bite, not one serving. It was also the first time I did not sleep away Thanksgiving afternoon due to allergic reactions.

I also did One New Thing this year while travelling. I scoped out restaurants beforehand. It didn’t take much planning and my family graciously made decisions ahead of time. As soon as I knew where we were going, I checked menus on-line. Knowing my options beforehand made a huge difference. There were times we ate out and I didn’t have a chance to scope places, then I simply ordered a salad. Only one time did the waiter have to ask about substitutions with a manager. I’ve learned to ask for the chicken (or other proteins  to be cooked plain, or to ask for fries without extra seasoning salt. It’s just easier to phrase it that way instead of telling the waiter lists of allergies and asking them what they think. There are too many “hidden” allergens. Many places have meat that is pre-seasoned. I stay ask if they come that way and just order something else. The simple phrases “gluten-free” and “food allergies” capture people’s attention and just about everyone was gracious about helping us with menu items. Whether you are  concerned with food allergies, gluten, or calorie counting, don’t be afraid to just ask! Before you even have to ask, look on-line! With menus posted on-line, it’s easy to count calories or watch for troublesome foods before you even step foot into a restaurant!

While at my sisters, I encountered one tea room that went out of their way to accommodate my gluten-free daughter. They told me that if I call the day before, they will make sure some menu items (since it’s a small establishment without a set menu) are gluten-free or safe from whatever allergies we have. We will make sure to visit that restaurant the next time we are in town! It just takes one question to realize how accommodating establishments are. The gracious ones will receive my business. In the past, I didn’t want to make a fuss, or cause any trouble. Then I would end up sick. Not anymore.

My One New Thing for the Holidays is to scope out restaurants beforehand!

What are your favorite holiday tips?

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